In the Precision Software News Round-Up: 3 August 2018, the US proposes tough new Russian sanctions, Levi Strauss & Co plan to reduce carbon emissions across their supply chain and in the Precision Report, we look at US export compliance. Plus this week we learnt that Dutch online shoppers make the most returns in the EU, and the Road Haulage Association warns that a no-deal Brexit could leave UK supermarkets empty.

SANCTIONS

US SENATORS PROPOSE STIFF RUSSIAN SANCTIONS

In a show of solidarity, US Republican and Democratic senators have proposed stiff new sanctions on Russia. This bill toughens the sanctions imposed last summer. These new sanctions aim to further punish Russia for interference in the 2016 US election as well as Russian activities in Syria and Ukraine. The proposed bill includes restrictions on new sovereign debt transactions, energy and oil projects, and uranium imports. The sanctions also target a number of Russian political figures and oligarchs. Furthermore, the bill includes support for NATO. The legislation proposes that two-thirds of the Senate would need to vote in favor of leaving NATO before the US could withdraw. For more on this, please click here.

SUPPLY CHAIN

LEVI STRAUSS TO REDUCE CARBON EMISSIONS ACROSS SUPPLY CHAIN

This week, clothing manufacturer Levi Strauss & Co announced a new climate action strategy. The plan calls for drastically cutting carbon emissions across its global supply chain as well as their own facilities 2025. The company also plans to use 100 percent renewable electricity in their own facilities. Levi Strauss & Co’s climate action plan uses science-based targets. These targets must be in line with the level of carbon emission reduction needed to keep global temperature increase below 2 degrees Celsius. For more on this, please click here.

RETAIL

DUTCH ARE MOST LIKELY TO RETURN ONLINE SHOPPING

Online shoppers return items in far greater numbers than bricks-and-mortar shoppers. Across Europe, the online shoppers most likely to return goods are the Dutch. That’s according to a survey done by DPD. The carriers’ E-Shopper Barometer found the people in the Netherlands return 9 percent of their online purchases. Half of these returns are clothes. The UK, Belgium and Switzerland are not far behind. Consumers in these countries return 8 percent of their e-commerce purchases. In a statement DPD added: “A large proportion of the Dutch people (89%) consider free returns to be important for online shopping, followed by transparent return costs (86%) and the possibility of delivering a parcel to a delivery point (75%). If webshops do not meet these conditions, e-shoppers are more likely to ignore this webshop.” For more on this, please see DPD’s E-Shopper Barometer.

LOGISTICS

BREXIT COULD CUT TRUCKER NUMBERS AND LEAVE SUPERMARKETS EMPTY

The Road Haulage Association has warned that a no-deal Brexit could put thousands of HGV drivers out of a job as well as leave supermarket shelves empty. Half of the UK’s food is imported. Most of this — 70 percent — comes from across the European Union. “The stark reality is that if customs controls are put in place, it will take an average of about 45 minutes to process one truck on both sides of the channel. If that happens then the queues of HGVs in Kent will make the jams seen in the summer of 2015 appear as little more than waiting for the traffic lights to change,” said RHA chief executive Richard Burnett. UK transport secretary Chris Grayling has promised that trucks will not need to be checked at ports. However, the RHA warns that French authorities may decide to do so. For more on this, please click here.

THE PRECISION REPORT

YOUR QUICK GUIDE TO ACE AND AES: ENSURING YOUR EXPORTS ARE COMPLIANT

ACE, AES, CBP, EEI, HS… US exporters have to deal with a lot of regulations — and a lot of abbreviations. One of the many duties of US Customs and Border Protection is regulating international trade. CBP is responsible for customs, including cargo screening. Companies must report their imports and exports to CBP and they do so using the Automated Exports System (AES) on the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) portal. Exporters who fail to comply or file incorrect information can face expensive delays and increased cycle times as well as civil and criminal penalties. In the latest Precision Report we look at ACE and AES and discuss how exporters can ensure ongoing compliance. To see the full report, please click here.